Mixedness
& mixing

New perspectives on mixed-race Britons

A CRE eConference · 4-6 September 2007

All papers

This pages lists all papers currently posted to this site. The most recent are shown first.

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There are 44 papers listed here.

Expert opinion - participation

Expert panel,)

Expert panel

Author

Expert panel,

Date posted

Thursday 06 September 2007

Abstract
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Expert opinion - interaction

Expert panel,)

Expert panel

Author

Expert panel,

Date posted

Wednesday 05 September 2007

Abstract

Responses to papers relating to interaction by Dr Chamion Caballero, Sharron Hall and Dr Rob Berkley.

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Expert opinion - equality

Expert panel)

Author

Expert panel

Date posted

Tuesday 04 September 2007

Abstract

Responses to papers relating to equality from Dr Rob Berkley, Dr Chamion Caballero and Sharron Hall.

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Judgement of Solomon

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds, British Association for Adoption and Fostering

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds

Author

Date posted

Monday 03 September 2007

Abstract

The title of this paper comes from the story of King Solomon, who made a judgement in the case of two women who came to see him carrying a dead baby and a living one with each claiming the living child as her own. Solomon ordered that the living child be cut in two and that half be given to each mother. When one woman gave up her claim rather than see the child killed, Solomon at once recognised her as the true mother. This powerful story is indicative of the kind of judgement that social workers are often in the position of making when deciding which family to place a 'looked after' child with, including those of mixed heritage.

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Interaction

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Policy First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Disability

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination

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First person: Amanda Hussain

Amanda Hussain, Journalist and broadcaster)

Amanda Hussain

Author

Amanda Hussain, Journalist and broadcaster

Date posted

Monday 03 September 2007

Abstract

I'm a broadcaster and live in Winchester, Hampshire, with my husband Ian, a film publicist, and our five-year-old daughter, Lola. I'm used to describing myself as mixed race and yet a friend recently picked me upon it and argued that we should now be saying 'dual heritage' instead.

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Religion or belief

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Identity Families Racism and discrimination

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Media

Not Black Enough

Lin King,)

Lin King

Author

Lin King,

Date posted

Friday 31 August 2007

Abstract

I was born in 1949 to a white woman and a black father. I was put into care from birth. I do not think that this was unusual at the time. Although I do not know of any research to substantiate this, I believe the pressure on white women to give mixed race babies up existed at that time. The pressure may still exist, as the care system today, is full of mixed race, hard to place children.

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Interaction

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Older people

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Identity Families Racism and discrimination

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Thai-British Families: Towards a deeper understanding of 'mixedness'

Jessica Mai Sims, The Runnymede Trust)

Jessica Mai Sims

Author

Jessica Mai Sims, The Runnymede Trust

Date posted

Wednesday 29 August 2007

Abstract

Little Britain's characters Ting Tong Macadangdang and her White British husband Dudley, have become the most famous Thai-White British relationship in British media. This sketch, along with press coverage of Thai women migrating to Britain, have set the standard profile of the life of a Thai woman in Britain, not as a woman, or someone of Thai ethnicity, but as a 'Thai Bride' found on the internet through dating agencies.

This article will explore the challenges Thai-White British relationships face, the strategies couples employ to confront stereotypes and the implications of the lack of positive images of Thai culture and mixed Thai relationships for Thai and mixed Thai/British young people. The following case presented here of both mixed Thai-White British families and mixed Thai/White British people will endeavour to present a deeper understanding on the meaning of 'mixing' and 'mixedness' for Britain.

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Interaction

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Research

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Gender

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Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

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Assimilation and mixed-race populations

Dr D. Emily Hicks, San Diego State University)

Dr D. Emily Hicks

Author

Dr D. Emily Hicks, San Diego State University

Date posted

Wednesday 29 August 2007

Abstract

A personal reflection on mixed ancestry in relation to the Melungeons and hip hop.

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Participation

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Young people

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Identity Families

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Culture and sport

The Need for a New Mix: Literature and Cultural Representation

Adebe DeRango-Adem, York University Toronto)

Adebe DeRango-Adem

Author

Adebe DeRango-Adem, York University Toronto

Date posted

Wednesday 29 August 2007

Abstract

My academic research has brought me to a problematic theme in the literary tradition: the disappearance of mixed race individuals, who are caught between racial worlds and are represented as neither here nor there, unable to 'survive' conflict, able to exist only when slotted into one racial category or another. My studies in English Literature - as well as literary theory - have brought me to realize that much contemporary Western literature is unable to conceptualize of the mixed race individual who inhabits a 'marginal space' - perhaps because they in fact serve to defy all margins.

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Identity

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Media

People in harmony

Jill Olumide, People in Harmony)

Jill Olumide

Author

Jill Olumide, People in Harmony

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

People in Harmony is a charity that has been active for some 35 years. It was formed as a self help group to offer a refuge to mixed race families and mixed race people from the onslaught of the politics of the time (the heyday of Enoch Powell) when the race card was often played with reference to the perceived unnatural and inappropriate (if not distasteful) practise and outcomes of race mixing.


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Participation

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Research Policy First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Gender Sexual orientation

Main themes:

Identity Families

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Health Employment Education Criminal justice

Gendering mixed-race - deconstructing mixedness

Dr Suki Ali, London School of Economics and Political Science)

Dr Suki Ali

Author

Dr Suki Ali, London School of Economics and Political Science

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

This short paper arises from the workshop of the same title from which this collection comes, in which we presented some of our perspectives on the contemporary interest in mixedness. As such this paper aims to add some thoughts to an ongoing debate about research into mixed-race, and how this is and might be configured by the current debates about mixedness in the UK; this is not an academic paper per se, but draws upon my own research in this area.

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Equality

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Research Policy

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Gender

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Against the term 'mixed-race'

Linda Bellos, Diversity Solutions)

Linda Bellos

Author

Linda Bellos, Diversity Solutions

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

I loath the term 'mixed race' almost as much I as I loath 'half-caste' as a description of who I am or part of who I am. What does 'full-caste' look like, I wonder? What exactly is a 'race' in terms of biology, genetics or societies?

These are some of the questions that arise when a racist society seeks to define individuals in terms of their 'race'.

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Equality

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Identity Racism and discrimination

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Meeting the Educational Needs of Mixed Heritage Pupils: Challenges for Policy and Practice

Leon Tikly, University of Bristol)

Leon Tikly

Author

Leon Tikly, University of Bristol

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

The aim of the article is to present evidence concerning the educational needs of mixed heritage pupils and in particular those of White/Black Caribbean origin and to outline the challenges for policy and practice in meeting the needs of these learners. The article draws on and extends the findings of original research (Tikly, Caballero, Haynes and Hill; 2004) which was sponsored by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind . The article will begin by outlining the evidence relating to the achievement of White/Black Caribbean pupils and the nature of the barriers to achievement facing this group. This will provide a basis for a discussion in the second part of the article about the challenges facing policy makers and practitioners.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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Research Policy First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Education

The diversity of the 'mixed' race population in Britain

Miri Song, University of Kent)

Miri Song

Author

Miri Song, University of Kent

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

The growth of 'mixed race' people and relationships today makes nonsense out of the idea that there exist distinct, 'natural' 'races' among people in multiethnic societies around the world. The population of the UK is becoming increasingly diverse in terms of ethnicity, race, religion, and national identity. For the first time, the growth in 'mixed race' people was officially recognized by the inclusion of a "mixed" group in the 2001 UK Census, in which about 674,000 people were identified as 'mixed'. Demographers have identified the "mixed" group as one of the fastest growing of all ethnic groups, estimating that by 2010 it will have increased by more than 40 per cent (or by more than 80 per cent by 2020) compared with 2001.

Yet in spite of its growing importance in demographic terms and its entry into 'official' data collection, relatively little is known about the life experiences of so-called 'mixed' people, or how this new population grouping identifies in ethnic and racial terms - information which is crucial for our understandings of cultural diversity and the delivery of culturally competent public services.

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You wouldn’t let it lie

Dr Daniel McNeil, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation and University of Hull)

Dr Daniel McNeil

Author

Dr Daniel McNeil, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation and University of Hull

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

This short paper connects the author's past in England to Donna Bailey Nurse, a contemporary critic in Canada who has made a number of problematic comments about mixed-race people and their relationship to 'authentic Blackness'. It then goes on to discuss a Black Atlantic and the dangers of a mononational approach to 'race' and 'mixed-race'.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Culture and sport

Mixed Heritage: Perspectives On Health And Welfare

Mark R D Johnson, )

Mark R D Johnson

Author

Mark R D Johnson,

Date posted

Monday 27 August 2007

Abstract
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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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Research

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Identity Families

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Health

A mixed society should be a positive society

Graham Suppiah,)

Graham Suppiah

Author

Graham Suppiah,

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

A summary of issues facing mixed-race people/single parents with mixed-race children in today's society.

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Equality

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Gender Young people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Health Criminal justice Culture and sport

It’s time for foundation

Sharron Hall, Intermix)

Sharron Hall

Author

Sharron Hall, Intermix

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

As a working class mixed-race woman I do not see the mixed-race experience from an academic's view. Instead I live it, feel it, am hurt and comforted by it.

Ten years ago the term mixed-race wasn't even in general UK circulation, white mothers were being advised to tell their mixed-race children they were black and the idea of a mixed-race identity and history were dreams to people like me and nightmares to those who wanted to keep the races pure.

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Participation

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First person perspective

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Identity Racism and discrimination

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'Mixed' families: assumptions and new approaches

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University)

Dr Chamion Caballero

Author

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

Couples from different racial and ethnic backgrounds and their 'mixed' children are increasingly visible in the public eye. Though Britain has long been host to mixed relationships and population groups, since the 1990s there has been a noticeable public interest in those who are part of, or a product of, mixed relationships; what has been dubbed 'Beige' or 'Brown Britain'.

However, while more and more is known about those who identify themselves as belonging to the group the Census has called 'Mixed', parents of mixed children in Britain continue to be subject to longstanding assumptions and stereotypes, ones which often presume their racial, ethnic and socioeconomic profiles, their inability to raise their children with healthy racialised identities or the hypersexual nature of their marriage or relationship.

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Interaction

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Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

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Media

Black and Minority Ethnic health inequalities and the 'mixed-race' population

Ayo Bakare, Multiple Heritage Voices)

Ayo Bakare

Author

Ayo Bakare, Multiple Heritage Voices

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

In 2006 I carried out research focusing on the recognition of inequalities in health for Black and Minority Ethnic groups. It specifically focused on if, and how these inequalities will effect the growing mixed race population and the implications this may have on existing health policy. It also explored issues of identity as a critique on existing outdated research, in an effort to gain insight into how mixed race people feel they are perceived ('racially') by society and how they want to be perceived.


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Equality

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Policy

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Identity Racism and discrimination

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Health Education

Statistics

Charlie Owen, Thomas Coram Research Unit)

Charlie Owen

Author

Charlie Owen, Thomas Coram Research Unit

Date posted

Thursday 23 August 2007

Abstract

In the 2001 census, one and a quarter percent of all people in England and Wales were of mixed origin: one sixth of the minority ethnic population were of mixed origin. Almost four percent of all under-5s in England and Wales were of mixed origin: one quarter of the minority ethnic population of under-5s were of mixed origin. This is a huge demographic shift in the population. What is most striking is not just the growth of the mixed populations as a percentage of the total population but as a percentage of the minority ethnic population.

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A white woman’s experience of “mixing”

Gill Lawrence, writer)

Gill Lawrence

Author

Gill Lawrence, writer

Date posted

Wednesday 22 August 2007

Abstract

If you have grown up in a predominantly white community, suddenly experiencing racism when you have Black friends or lovers can be quite a shock.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Gender

Main themes:

Relationships Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Health Employment Criminal justice

Mixed race - The future’s bright, the future’s blended

Dr Nathalie van Meurs, Middlesex University)

Author

Dr Nathalie van Meurs, Middlesex University

Date posted

Tuesday 21 August 2007

Abstract

This paper uses theory and findings from the field of social psychology to question the usefulness of the concept of 'race'. Scientists agree that differences between races or ethnic groups are clinal (genetically inherited traits gradually change in frequency from one geographic region to another) and not categorical. Then why do we still use racial categories to define people and is mixedness a prime indicator that we need to re-evaluate the concept of race? Furthermore, what is the role of the media and government in this process and what is required to overcome humans natural tendency to differentiate between groups?

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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Research

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Young people Older people

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Identity Racism and discrimination

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Mixed-race theory for everyone

Dr Jin Haritaworn, Goldsmiths College)

Dr Jin Haritaworn

Author

Dr Jin Haritaworn, Goldsmiths College

Date posted

Monday 20 August 2007

Abstract

What insights does mixed-race theory bear for mixed-race people, our allies, and the professionals who work with us? This paper introduces three lessons which are especially relevant in this time and place.

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Equality

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Research Policy

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Identity Racism and discrimination

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Enigmatic or enriched?

Tod O'Brien, )

Tod O'Brien

Author

Tod O'Brien,

Date posted

Monday 20 August 2007

Abstract

Personal experience of being a mixed heritage, British-born person. The paper emphasises the need for integration through the recruitment, retention and progression of Black and Minority Ethnic people into the policy making institutions of society to create an ethical and leveraging of diversity for the benefit of all.

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Participation

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First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Older people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Criminal justice

On being mixed race

Sir Keith Ajegbo, consultant)

Sir Keith Ajegbo

Author

Sir Keith Ajegbo, consultant

Date posted

Saturday 18 August 2007

Abstract

This is a personal reflection on being mixed race and what I see as the issues for mixed race children now. It is based on being a headteacher in inner London for many years and working with mixed race students. It is not based on researched evidence.

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Interaction

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First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education

Ethnic Intermarriage: Love is not enough

Bina Radia-Bond, University of London)

Bina Radia-Bond

Author

Bina Radia-Bond, University of London

Date posted

Saturday 18 August 2007

Abstract

Mixed relationships are indubitably a rising global trend. Britain has the highest rate in Europe. This should not, however, be taken as a utopian move towards the romantic blurring of ethnic boundaries: the majority of people are still most comfortable with a partner who shares their cultural background and social history.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Religion or belief Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families

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Community through Diversity: Mixed-Race Identity Online

Veli Aghdiran, The Runnymede Trust)

Veli Aghdiran

Author

Veli Aghdiran, The Runnymede Trust

Date posted

Friday 17 August 2007

Abstract

A look at how mixed-race online groups are pushing the notion of community in a fresh direction, and the positive repercussions this might have.

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Identity

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Media

Equality and mixed couples: the final frontier

Ashley Chisholm, MixTogether.org)

Ashley Chisholm

Author

Ashley Chisholm, MixTogether.org

Date posted

Friday 17 August 2007

Abstract

This paper is drawn from the collective experience of MixTogether.org.

It addresses some of the difficulties facing couples who would like to mix.

It argues that years of work on equality have created an atmosphere where more and more young people have the confidence to mix. However, this also means that everyone who has supported equality now has an obligation to support mixed couples.

Many young mixed couples face strong family opposition. To allow this to continue unchecked, risks undermining the moral case for all work on equality. More importantly, it risks the happiness of young mixed couples. They should be given help to thrive, so that they can serve as an example to the rest of society.

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Relationships Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Dodging the -ism

Dr Sarita Malik, Brunel University)

Dr Sarita Malik

Author

Dr Sarita Malik, Brunel University

Date posted

Friday 17 August 2007

Abstract

The problematisation of 'mixedness' is reminiscent of the ways in which ethnic 'others' have historically been managed and culturally perceived in the UK. Recent debate has revealed the imbricating threads around the state and status of Britain's growing mixed race population, particularly when those who inhabit it are related to so-called 'disadvantaged' or 'visible' ethnic minority groups. The phrase 'mixed race' is itself often racially coded, typically used to refer to a Black/Asian and White correlation. General representations of 'in-between-ness' are based around themes of cultural divisiveness, uncertainty and conflict. The mixed-race Briton is apparently unable to resolve their different parts into a whole, cohesive identity. This idea of the 'identity-crisis' or 'culture clash', has been a long-running image of young ethnic minorities in Britain, perpetuated in media representations and public discussions for several decades. It functions as a kind of shorthand for understanding what, in fact, is a far more complex and layered place to be.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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Policy First person perspective

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Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Identifications and cultural practices of mixed-heritage youth

Prof Martyn Barrett, University of Surrey)

Prof Martyn Barrett

Author

Prof Martyn Barrett, University of Surrey

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

This paper summarises findings from a research study which investigated how 11- to 17-year-old mixed-heritage adolescents living in London negotiate the demands of living with multiple cultures. The study also explored how these adolescents construe themselves in terms of race, ethnicity and nationality. It was found that these individuals had multiple identifications which were subjectively salient to them, and that they were very adept at managing their various identities in different situations. There was no evidence of a sense of marginality, or of being 'caught between two cultures', and there was no difference in the strength of British identification exhibited by these mixed-heritage adolescents and white English adolescents of the same age. However, the identities and cultural practices of the mixed-heritage adolescents were fluid and context-dependent, and they appreciated the advantages of being able to negotiate and interact with multiple ethnic worlds.

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Criminal justice Culture and sport Media

Mixed Race and Mixed Families in Britain: The Case of Growing up in a Mixed Faith Family

Dr Elisabeth Arweck, University of Warwick)

Dr Elisabeth Arweck

Author

Dr Elisabeth Arweck, University of Warwick

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

The present contribution presents a research project which is currently underway at the University of Warwick. It is concerned with the religious identity formation of young people who grow up in mixed faith families. The paper embeds the issues involved in the wider context of 'mixedness', communities, and cohesion.

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Interaction

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Religion or belief Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education

Mixed Goals

Leon Mann,)

Leon Mann

Author

Leon Mann,

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

A first person perspective on how football and the experiences of mixed race professional footballers offers an insight into the issues facing mixed race people in society.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

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First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people Older people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Culture and sport

Black and White doesn't do the trick

Toby Laurent Belson, Artist and designer)

Toby Laurent Belson

Author

Toby Laurent Belson, Artist and designer

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

Experience of growing up in a mixed West London community with the terms 'Black' and 'White'.

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Interaction

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First person perspective

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Young people

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education Culture and sport

The elephant in the room

Tanya Datta, BBC)

Tanya Datta

Author

Tanya Datta, BBC

Date posted

Wednesday 15 August 2007

Abstract

Last year, journalist Tanya Datta made a documentary called 'The Last Taboo' for BBC Radio 4. In the programme, she explored inter-racial romance between Asian and African-Caribbean people and why it can often spark fierce opposition.

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Research

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Young people Older people

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Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Mixed race people in advertising

Emma Dabiri,)

Emma Dabiri

Author

Emma Dabiri,

Date posted

Wednesday 15 August 2007

Abstract

"London is the home of most of the advertising industry. 20 per cent of the population is from an ethnic minority background but only 4.5 per cent of people in advertising agencies are from ethnic minorities, and the majority of them are in support disciplines such as IT and accounts departments," says Jonathan Mildenhall (joint managing director of TBWA, co-chair of the IPA's Ethnic Diversity Committee, who is himself mixed-race). In some agencies, the lack of black executives is so acute that it is not unknown for them to scurry out and hire one or two black recruits if they win an account with an ethnic target market."There aren't enough people from ethnic minorities in advertising," agrees Stephen Woodford, president of the IPA. "We need to address this for both moral and pragmatic reasons."

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A mixed-race experience

Bradley Lincoln, Multiple Heritage Project)

Bradley Lincoln

Author

Bradley Lincoln, Multiple Heritage Project

Date posted

Wednesday 15 August 2007

Abstract

I am 37 year-old man living in Manchester. A son, a brother an uncle and I love reggae music. I have worked in education for the past 15 years and currently manage the Multiple Heritage Project. Who I am is made up of lots of different things and shifts depending on the context and what questions I am being asked. Some things people find quirky about me, my liking for brown shoes is just one. My racial identity is also something of a talking-point to people. I self-identify as mixed race, not black. Not confused, not caught between cultures, not a marginal man. I am me. But getting to know me wasn't easy!

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Participation

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Education

The mixed race population and enjoying art and culture

Hassan Mahamdallie, Arts Council England)

Hassan Mahamdallie

Author

Hassan Mahamdallie, Arts Council England

Date posted

Tuesday 14 August 2007

Abstract

Knowing that someone is of a mixed race background can only be the start of being able to understand who they are and their true potential.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Participation

Paper type:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Religion or belief

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Culture and sport

Racial Identity - to have or to be

Isabel Adonis, writer)

Isabel Adonis

Author

Isabel Adonis, writer

Date posted

Monday 13 August 2007

Abstract

Erich Fromm distinguishes two kinds of identity, characterized in terms of having and being. The 'having' identity is grounded in the external and material, while the 'being' identity is grounded within the person. I suggest that race is an external identity, and therefore both fragile and divisive.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Paper type:

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Identity as relationship

Bob Macintosh, amateur philosopher and charity worker)

Bob Macintosh

Author

Bob Macintosh, amateur philosopher and charity worker

Date posted

Thursday 09 August 2007

Abstract

A personal reflection on being white in a mixed race family.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Learning about racism

Sue Funge, founder of the Starlight Black Child Mixed Heritage group)

Sue Funge

Author

Sue Funge, founder of the Starlight Black Child Mixed Heritage group

Date posted

Monday 06 August 2007

Abstract

The personal journey of a white mum, Sue Funge, bringing up Rory, her black son of mixed heritage.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Participation

Paper type:

First person perspective First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Media

Mixed Race Britain - Through My Eyes

Rory Campbell, twenty-three years old with a keen interest in black history)

Rory Campbell

Author

Rory Campbell, twenty-three years old with a keen interest in black history

Date posted

Monday 06 August 2007

Abstract

I am Rory Campbell. My mother is white and my father is black. I don't remember ever meeting my father and have been raised by my mother my whole life. I don't feel I have ever had a positive black role model but my mum always tried to make me aware of my black history and I feel that this helped me to form the belief that all people are equal and anyone who thinks otherwise is just wrong.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Older people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families

Specific themes:

Culture and sport

First person: Eve Ahmed

Eve Ahmed, freelance journalist)

Eve Ahmed

Author

Eve Ahmed, freelance journalist

Date posted

Monday 30 July 2007

Abstract

When I was growing up, life was bleached white. At all three of my schools - infant's, primary and secondary - there were two or three lonely-looking African Caribbean and Asian girls, while everyone else was definitively pale-skinned. That's what south London was like during the 1970's and 80's. There was no-one else around like me. I was the sole 'beige' person, with a Pakistani dad and an English mum.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Gender Religion or belief Young people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Media

Identity, Young People and Integration

Policy and Public Sector Directorate, Commission for Racial Equality)

Author

Policy and Public Sector Directorate, Commission for Racial Equality

Date posted

Tuesday 17 July 2007

Abstract

When the CRE held a seminar earlier this year about young people, identity and integration it didn't take long for the discussion to turn to the mixed-race experience. The aim of the seminar was to bring together researchers and policy makers to discuss current issues relating to identity and integration and consider how an understanding of identity might help address policy problems relating to equality, interaction and participation.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Paper type:

Policy

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes: