Mixedness
& mixing

New perspectives on mixed-race Britons

A CRE eConference · 4-6 September 2007

Papers by keyword: 'interaction'

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There are 14 papers in this category.

Expert opinion - interaction

Expert panel,)

Expert panel

Author

Expert panel,

Date posted

Wednesday 05 September 2007

Abstract

Responses to papers relating to interaction by Dr Chamion Caballero, Sharron Hall and Dr Rob Berkley.

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Judgement of Solomon

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds, British Association for Adoption and Fostering

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds

Author

Date posted

Monday 03 September 2007

Abstract

The title of this paper comes from the story of King Solomon, who made a judgement in the case of two women who came to see him carrying a dead baby and a living one with each claiming the living child as her own. Solomon ordered that the living child be cut in two and that half be given to each mother. When one woman gave up her claim rather than see the child killed, Solomon at once recognised her as the true mother. This powerful story is indicative of the kind of judgement that social workers are often in the position of making when deciding which family to place a 'looked after' child with, including those of mixed heritage.

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Policy First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Disability

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Not Black Enough

Lin King,)

Lin King

Author

Lin King,

Date posted

Friday 31 August 2007

Abstract

I was born in 1949 to a white woman and a black father. I was put into care from birth. I do not think that this was unusual at the time. Although I do not know of any research to substantiate this, I believe the pressure on white women to give mixed race babies up existed at that time. The pressure may still exist, as the care system today, is full of mixed race, hard to place children.

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Older people

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Identity Families Racism and discrimination

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Thai-British Families: Towards a deeper understanding of 'mixedness'

Jessica Mai Sims, The Runnymede Trust)

Jessica Mai Sims

Author

Jessica Mai Sims, The Runnymede Trust

Date posted

Wednesday 29 August 2007

Abstract

Little Britain's characters Ting Tong Macadangdang and her White British husband Dudley, have become the most famous Thai-White British relationship in British media. This sketch, along with press coverage of Thai women migrating to Britain, have set the standard profile of the life of a Thai woman in Britain, not as a woman, or someone of Thai ethnicity, but as a 'Thai Bride' found on the internet through dating agencies.

This article will explore the challenges Thai-White British relationships face, the strategies couples employ to confront stereotypes and the implications of the lack of positive images of Thai culture and mixed Thai relationships for Thai and mixed Thai/British young people. The following case presented here of both mixed Thai-White British families and mixed Thai/White British people will endeavour to present a deeper understanding on the meaning of 'mixing' and 'mixedness' for Britain.

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Gender

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

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You wouldn’t let it lie

Dr Daniel McNeil, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation and University of Hull)

Dr Daniel McNeil

Author

Dr Daniel McNeil, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation and University of Hull

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

This short paper connects the author's past in England to Donna Bailey Nurse, a contemporary critic in Canada who has made a number of problematic comments about mixed-race people and their relationship to 'authentic Blackness'. It then goes on to discuss a Black Atlantic and the dangers of a mononational approach to 'race' and 'mixed-race'.

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Culture and sport

'Mixed' families: assumptions and new approaches

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University)

Dr Chamion Caballero

Author

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

Couples from different racial and ethnic backgrounds and their 'mixed' children are increasingly visible in the public eye. Though Britain has long been host to mixed relationships and population groups, since the 1990s there has been a noticeable public interest in those who are part of, or a product of, mixed relationships; what has been dubbed 'Beige' or 'Brown Britain'.

However, while more and more is known about those who identify themselves as belonging to the group the Census has called 'Mixed', parents of mixed children in Britain continue to be subject to longstanding assumptions and stereotypes, ones which often presume their racial, ethnic and socioeconomic profiles, their inability to raise their children with healthy racialised identities or the hypersexual nature of their marriage or relationship.

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Research Policy

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Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

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On being mixed race

Sir Keith Ajegbo, consultant)

Sir Keith Ajegbo

Author

Sir Keith Ajegbo, consultant

Date posted

Saturday 18 August 2007

Abstract

This is a personal reflection on being mixed race and what I see as the issues for mixed race children now. It is based on being a headteacher in inner London for many years and working with mixed race students. It is not based on researched evidence.

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First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education

Ethnic Intermarriage: Love is not enough

Bina Radia-Bond, University of London)

Bina Radia-Bond

Author

Bina Radia-Bond, University of London

Date posted

Saturday 18 August 2007

Abstract

Mixed relationships are indubitably a rising global trend. Britain has the highest rate in Europe. This should not, however, be taken as a utopian move towards the romantic blurring of ethnic boundaries: the majority of people are still most comfortable with a partner who shares their cultural background and social history.

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Paper type:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Religion or belief Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families

Specific themes:

Equality and mixed couples: the final frontier

Ashley Chisholm, MixTogether.org)

Ashley Chisholm

Author

Ashley Chisholm, MixTogether.org

Date posted

Friday 17 August 2007

Abstract

This paper is drawn from the collective experience of MixTogether.org.

It addresses some of the difficulties facing couples who would like to mix.

It argues that years of work on equality have created an atmosphere where more and more young people have the confidence to mix. However, this also means that everyone who has supported equality now has an obligation to support mixed couples.

Many young mixed couples face strong family opposition. To allow this to continue unchecked, risks undermining the moral case for all work on equality. More importantly, it risks the happiness of young mixed couples. They should be given help to thrive, so that they can serve as an example to the rest of society.

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First person perspective

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Main themes:

Relationships Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Mixed Race and Mixed Families in Britain: The Case of Growing up in a Mixed Faith Family

Dr Elisabeth Arweck, University of Warwick)

Dr Elisabeth Arweck

Author

Dr Elisabeth Arweck, University of Warwick

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

The present contribution presents a research project which is currently underway at the University of Warwick. It is concerned with the religious identity formation of young people who grow up in mixed faith families. The paper embeds the issues involved in the wider context of 'mixedness', communities, and cohesion.

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Other conference theme(s) addressed:

Paper type:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Religion or belief Young people

Main themes:

Identity Families Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education

Black and White doesn't do the trick

Toby Laurent Belson, Artist and designer)

Toby Laurent Belson

Author

Toby Laurent Belson, Artist and designer

Date posted

Thursday 16 August 2007

Abstract

Experience of growing up in a mixed West London community with the terms 'Black' and 'White'.

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Other conference theme(s) addressed:

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education Culture and sport

The elephant in the room

Tanya Datta, BBC)

Tanya Datta

Author

Tanya Datta, BBC

Date posted

Wednesday 15 August 2007

Abstract

Last year, journalist Tanya Datta made a documentary called 'The Last Taboo' for BBC Radio 4. In the programme, she explored inter-racial romance between Asian and African-Caribbean people and why it can often spark fierce opposition.

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Research

Area of equality covered:

Young people Older people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Identity as relationship

Bob Macintosh, amateur philosopher and charity worker)

Bob Macintosh

Author

Bob Macintosh, amateur philosopher and charity worker

Date posted

Thursday 09 August 2007

Abstract

A personal reflection on being white in a mixed race family.

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First person perspective

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Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

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Mixed Race Britain - Through My Eyes

Rory Campbell, twenty-three years old with a keen interest in black history)

Rory Campbell

Author

Rory Campbell, twenty-three years old with a keen interest in black history

Date posted

Monday 06 August 2007

Abstract

I am Rory Campbell. My mother is white and my father is black. I don't remember ever meeting my father and have been raised by my mother my whole life. I don't feel I have ever had a positive black role model but my mum always tried to make me aware of my black history and I feel that this helped me to form the belief that all people are equal and anyone who thinks otherwise is just wrong.

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Other conference theme(s) addressed:

Paper type:

First person perspective

Area of equality covered:

Older people

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families

Specific themes:

Culture and sport