Mixedness
& mixing

New perspectives on mixed-race Britons

A CRE eConference · 4-6 September 2007

Papers by keyword: 'policy'

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There are 10 papers in this category.

Judgement of Solomon

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds, British Association for Adoption and Fostering

Savita De Sousa & John Simmonds

Author

Date posted

Monday 03 September 2007

Abstract

The title of this paper comes from the story of King Solomon, who made a judgement in the case of two women who came to see him carrying a dead baby and a living one with each claiming the living child as her own. Solomon ordered that the living child be cut in two and that half be given to each mother. When one woman gave up her claim rather than see the child killed, Solomon at once recognised her as the true mother. This powerful story is indicative of the kind of judgement that social workers are often in the position of making when deciding which family to place a 'looked after' child with, including those of mixed heritage.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

Other types of paper:

Practice

Area of equality covered:

Disability

Main themes:

Identity Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

People in harmony

Jill Olumide, People in Harmony)

Jill Olumide

Author

Jill Olumide, People in Harmony

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

People in Harmony is a charity that has been active for some 35 years. It was formed as a self help group to offer a refuge to mixed race families and mixed race people from the onslaught of the politics of the time (the heyday of Enoch Powell) when the race card was often played with reference to the perceived unnatural and inappropriate (if not distasteful) practise and outcomes of race mixing.


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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Participation

Other types of paper:

Research Practice

Area of equality covered:

Gender Sexual orientation

Main themes:

Identity Families

Specific themes:

Health Employment Education Criminal justice

Gendering mixed-race - deconstructing mixedness

Dr Suki Ali, London School of Economics and Political Science)

Dr Suki Ali

Author

Dr Suki Ali, London School of Economics and Political Science

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

This short paper arises from the workshop of the same title from which this collection comes, in which we presented some of our perspectives on the contemporary interest in mixedness. As such this paper aims to add some thoughts to an ongoing debate about research into mixed-race, and how this is and might be configured by the current debates about mixedness in the UK; this is not an academic paper per se, but draws upon my own research in this area.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Gender

Main themes:

Specific themes:

Meeting the Educational Needs of Mixed Heritage Pupils: Challenges for Policy and Practice

Leon Tikly, University of Bristol)

Leon Tikly

Author

Leon Tikly, University of Bristol

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

The aim of the article is to present evidence concerning the educational needs of mixed heritage pupils and in particular those of White/Black Caribbean origin and to outline the challenges for policy and practice in meeting the needs of these learners. The article draws on and extends the findings of original research (Tikly, Caballero, Haynes and Hill; 2004) which was sponsored by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind . The article will begin by outlining the evidence relating to the achievement of White/Black Caribbean pupils and the nature of the barriers to achievement facing this group. This will provide a basis for a discussion in the second part of the article about the challenges facing policy makers and practitioners.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Research Practice

Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination Community cohesion

Specific themes:

Education

The diversity of the 'mixed' race population in Britain

Miri Song, University of Kent)

Miri Song

Author

Miri Song, University of Kent

Date posted

Tuesday 28 August 2007

Abstract

The growth of 'mixed race' people and relationships today makes nonsense out of the idea that there exist distinct, 'natural' 'races' among people in multiethnic societies around the world. The population of the UK is becoming increasingly diverse in terms of ethnicity, race, religion, and national identity. For the first time, the growth in 'mixed race' people was officially recognized by the inclusion of a "mixed" group in the 2001 UK Census, in which about 674,000 people were identified as 'mixed'. Demographers have identified the "mixed" group as one of the fastest growing of all ethnic groups, estimating that by 2010 it will have increased by more than 40 per cent (or by more than 80 per cent by 2020) compared with 2001.

Yet in spite of its growing importance in demographic terms and its entry into 'official' data collection, relatively little is known about the life experiences of so-called 'mixed' people, or how this new population grouping identifies in ethnic and racial terms - information which is crucial for our understandings of cultural diversity and the delivery of culturally competent public services.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Gender

Main themes:

Specific themes:

'Mixed' families: assumptions and new approaches

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University)

Dr Chamion Caballero

Author

Dr Chamion Caballero, London South Bank University

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

Couples from different racial and ethnic backgrounds and their 'mixed' children are increasingly visible in the public eye. Though Britain has long been host to mixed relationships and population groups, since the 1990s there has been a noticeable public interest in those who are part of, or a product of, mixed relationships; what has been dubbed 'Beige' or 'Brown Britain'.

However, while more and more is known about those who identify themselves as belonging to the group the Census has called 'Mixed', parents of mixed children in Britain continue to be subject to longstanding assumptions and stereotypes, ones which often presume their racial, ethnic and socioeconomic profiles, their inability to raise their children with healthy racialised identities or the hypersexual nature of their marriage or relationship.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Interaction

Other types of paper:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity Relationships Families Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Black and Minority Ethnic health inequalities and the 'mixed-race' population

Ayo Bakare, Multiple Heritage Voices)

Ayo Bakare

Author

Ayo Bakare, Multiple Heritage Voices

Date posted

Friday 24 August 2007

Abstract

In 2006 I carried out research focusing on the recognition of inequalities in health for Black and Minority Ethnic groups. It specifically focused on if, and how these inequalities will effect the growing mixed race population and the implications this may have on existing health policy. It also explored issues of identity as a critique on existing outdated research, in an effort to gain insight into how mixed race people feel they are perceived ('racially') by society and how they want to be perceived.


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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Health Education

Mixed-race theory for everyone

Dr Jin Haritaworn, Goldsmiths College)

Dr Jin Haritaworn

Author

Dr Jin Haritaworn, Goldsmiths College

Date posted

Monday 20 August 2007

Abstract

What insights does mixed-race theory bear for mixed-race people, our allies, and the professionals who work with us? This paper introduces three lessons which are especially relevant in this time and place.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Research

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity Racism and discrimination

Specific themes:

Dodging the -ism

Dr Sarita Malik, Brunel University)

Dr Sarita Malik

Author

Dr Sarita Malik, Brunel University

Date posted

Friday 17 August 2007

Abstract

The problematisation of 'mixedness' is reminiscent of the ways in which ethnic 'others' have historically been managed and culturally perceived in the UK. Recent debate has revealed the imbricating threads around the state and status of Britain's growing mixed race population, particularly when those who inhabit it are related to so-called 'disadvantaged' or 'visible' ethnic minority groups. The phrase 'mixed race' is itself often racially coded, typically used to refer to a Black/Asian and White correlation. General representations of 'in-between-ness' are based around themes of cultural divisiveness, uncertainty and conflict. The mixed-race Briton is apparently unable to resolve their different parts into a whole, cohesive identity. This idea of the 'identity-crisis' or 'culture clash', has been a long-running image of young ethnic minorities in Britain, perpetuated in media representations and public discussions for several decades. It functions as a kind of shorthand for understanding what, in fact, is a far more complex and layered place to be.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

Equality

Other types of paper:

Practice

Area of equality covered:

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes:

Identity, Young People and Integration

Policy and Public Sector Directorate, Commission for Racial Equality)

Author

Policy and Public Sector Directorate, Commission for Racial Equality

Date posted

Tuesday 17 July 2007

Abstract

When the CRE held a seminar earlier this year about young people, identity and integration it didn't take long for the discussion to turn to the mixed-race experience. The aim of the seminar was to bring together researchers and policy makers to discuss current issues relating to identity and integration and consider how an understanding of identity might help address policy problems relating to equality, interaction and participation.

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Conference theme(s) addressed:

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Area of equality covered:

Young people

Main themes:

Identity

Specific themes: